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Sunday, August 9, 2020 | History

4 edition of Volcano hazards in the Mount Jefferson region, Oregon found in the catalog.

Volcano hazards in the Mount Jefferson region, Oregon

Volcano hazards in the Mount Jefferson region, Oregon

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  • 35 Currently reading

Published by U.S. Dept. of the Interior, U.S. Geological Survey, Information Services [distributor] in [Menlo Park, CA], Denver, CO .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Volcanic hazard analysis -- Oregon -- Jefferson, Mount, Region

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby Joseph S. Walder ... [et al.]
    SeriesOpen-file report -- 99-24, U.S. Geological Survey open-file report -- 99-24
    ContributionsWalder, Joseph Scott, Geological Survey (U.S.)
    The Physical Object
    FormatMicroform
    Pagination14 p.
    Number of Pages14
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL14510226M
    OCLC/WorldCa44539316

    I am looking at an old hiking book from the s. There is a hike that is labeled "Bear Point". It is said to be four miles one way with an elevation gain of 2, and a high point of 6, ft. It is in the Mt. Jefferson Wilderness are and I am just wondering if this is the same hike that I found on line.   From: Walder, , , Volcano Hazards in the Mount Jefferson Region, Oregon: USGS Open-File Report How amazing is it that the gorgeously flat areas of Jefferson Park and the lakes therein are largely the work of glacial flooding!?

    One of Oregon's most spectacular attractions is the result of a spectacular volcanic event. Crater Lake is a large caldera, created by the collapse of the Mount Mazama volcano. Mazama rose as high. Plate 1 and Plate 2: Volcano hazards in the Mount Jefferson region, Oregon Figure I1. Map of the eastern half of the study area showing locations of volcanoes (Scott and others, ).

      The study, led by University of Oregon scientists, catalogued almost 3, volcanoes associated with the mountain range. It was published July 13 in the journal Geology. Towering above Ollalie Lake, Mount Jefferson, at 10, feet, is Oregon’s second highest summit. It’s snow-capped peak is a classic Cascade destination. Solo camping at one of the beautiful lakes in Jefferson Park. Hiking the whole PCT across the Wilderness is well worth it.


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Volcano hazards in the Mount Jefferson region, Oregon Download PDF EPUB FB2

Search Mount Jefferson for region-specific resources. Summit Post climbing and camping information for Mount Jefferson, Oregon—A resource for technical mountaineering information supported by a community of outdoor enthusiasts who share information and stories about backpacking, rock climbing, hiking, and camping.

Mount Jefferson (3, m, 10, ft) is the second tallest mountain in Oregon (after Mount Hood) and the only major volcanic center in the U.S. portion of the Cascade Range that hasn't erupted in. Mount Jefferson is a prominent feature of the landscape seen from highways east and west of the Cascades.

Mount Jefferson (one of thirteen major volcanic centers in the Cascade Range) has erupted repeatedly for hundreds of thousands of years, with its last eruptive episode during the last major glaciation which culminated ab years ago. USGS: Volcano Hazards Program - Cascades Volcano Observatory.

Mount Jefferson (3, m, 10, ft) is the second tallest mountain in Oregon (after Mount Hood) and the only major volcanic center in the U.S. portion of the Cascade Range that hasn't erupted in the p years. Summary. Mount Jefferson is a prominent feature of the landscape seen from highways east and west of the Cascades.

Mount Jefferson (one of thirteen major volcanic centers in the Cascade Range) has erupted repeatedly for hundreds of thousands of years, with its last eruptive episode during the last major glaciation which culminated ab years ago.

Jefferson has not erupted in historic time. There is a suspected eruption at South Cinder Peak in A.D. Jefferson erupted in 4, B.C. at Forked Butte, south-southeast of the main volcano. Additional information about Mt. Jefferson is presented on the Cascade Volcano Observatory homepage of the U.S.

Geological Survey. Volcano Hazards in the Mount Jefferson Region, Oregon By Joseph S. Walder, Cynthia A. Gardner, Richard M. Conrey, Bruce J. Fisher, and Steven P. Schilling Introduction Mount Jefferson is a prominent feature of the landscape seen from highways east and west of the Cascades.

Mount Jefferson (one of thirteen major volcanic centers in the Cascade. Mount Jefferson (pointed peak in middle) and Three Sisters (to the right) in Oregon, south-facing aerial view as seen from Mount St. Helens. Attribution: Natural Hazards, Volcano Hazards Program Office, Region 9: Columbia-Pacific Northwest, Mount Jefferson, Three Sisters.

Mount Hood is a potentially active volcano close to rapidly growing communities and recreation areas. The most likely widespread and hazardous consequence of a future eruption will be for lahars (rapidly moving mudflows) to sweep down the entire length of the Sandy (including the Zigzag) and White River valleys.

Lahars can be generated by hot volcanic flows that melt snow and ice or by. USGS: Volcano Hazards Program - Volcano Hazard Assessments are based on the geologic record. A long-term volcano hazard assessment report is a publication that summarizes the types and likelihood of future hazardous phenomena expected to occur at a specific volcano or volcanic region.

Volcano hazards in the Mount Jefferson region, Oregon Geomorphic change caused by outburst floods and debris flows at Mount Rainier, Washington, with emphasis on Tahoma Creek Valley by Joseph Scott Walder (Book) 2 editions published.

Multi-Hazard and Risk Study for the Mount Hood Region, Multnomah, Clackamas, and Hood River Counties, Oregon—Downloadable document including a risk and vulnerability study of volcanic hazards along the Sandy and Hood River valleys.

Study published by the State of Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI). The volcanoes are the result of the slow slide of dense oceanic crust as it sinks beneath North America (subduction), which releases water and melts overlying rock.

This rich volcanic zone contains the well-known landmark volcanoes, such as Mount St. Helens, Three Sisters, and Crater Lake and approximately 2, other known volcanic features.

Measurements of slope distances and vertical angles at Mount Baker and Mount Rainier, Washington, Mount Hood and Crater Lake, Oregon, and Mount Shasta and Lassen Peak, California, U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report,98 p. Mount Jefferson is a stratovolcano in the Cascade Volcanic Arc, part of the Cascade Range in the U.S.

state of second highest mountain in Oregon, it is situated within Linn County, Jefferson County, and Marion County and forms part of the Mount Jefferson to the ruggedness of its surroundings, the mountain is one of the hardest volcanoes to reach in the Cascades. Volcano and earthquake hazards in the Crater Lake region, Oregon.

U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 97–, 32 Pp., 1 plate, scaleMount Hood. Mount Jefferson, at 10, feet, is the second tallest peak in Oregon, with Mount Hood being the tallest.

Mount Jefferson is a stratovolcano which has erupted repeatedly for hundreds of thousands of years, with its last eruptive episode during the last major glaciation which en years ago. Olallie Butte is a steep-sided shield volcano in the Cascade Range of the northern part of the U.S.

state of is the largest volcano and highest point in the mile (80 km) distance between Mount Hood and Mount d just outside the Olallie Scenic Area, it is surrounded by more than lakes and ponds fed by runoff, precipitation, and underground seepage, which are.

Get this from a library. Volcano hazards in the Mount Jefferson region, Oregon. [Joseph Scott Walder; Geological Survey (U.S.);]. The Smithsonian Institution’s Global Volcanisms Project lists 20 active volcanoes in Oregon and seven in Washington (Table ).

Table Active Volcanoes in Oregon and Washington Volcano Type Last Eruption Oregon Mount Hood Stratovolcano Mount Jefferson Stratovolcano ; main volcano inactive for >10, years.

Mt Jefferson volcano, one of the lesser known Cascade volcanoes, is the second highest mountain in Oregon. Although it is deeply eroded and has probably not erupted for at least about years, it is still considered active.

Background: Jefferson was constructed in 2 major episodes interrupted by .Source: USGS “Volcano Hazards in the Mount Jefferson Region, Oregon” Earthquakes Earthquakes can trigger volcanic eruptions or they can cause them.

An earthquake produced by stress changes in solid rock from injection or withdrawal of magma (molten rock) is called a volcano-tectonic earthquake.The Cascade Range or Cascades is a major mountain range of western North America, extending from southern British Columbia through Washington and Oregon to Northern includes both non-volcanic mountains, such as the North Cascades, and the notable volcanoes known as the High small part of the range in British Columbia is referred to as the Canadian Cascades or.